traces of practice

I led a workshop with C-DaRE PhD students the other day and we looked at ideas and questions to do with documentation in practice-as-research projects. One of the things that we didn’t get to was a solo activity about the traces of practice. Here it is:

Task

Collect an (exhaustive) list of the various traces or parts of your research to date. These might be images, conversations, writings, scribbles, notes, images, videos, formal writing, audio recordings …

Reflection and questions

  • what are the traces of your practice(s)?
  • how might they be organised? (un/obvious)
  • what kinds of relationships exist between them?
  • what ideas might they be serving other than your practice?
  • what kinds of writing might make sense of and/or with these traces?
  • how might they help to change or evolve your practice?
  • what is missing?
  • what are others doing that you might steal?
  • what is un/necessary?
  • what is most/least clear?
  • who else has handled, organised, or developed similar traces?
  • what becomes available to you?
  • how do the other traces function? What if they are not other? How might a singular proposition, work, or iteration emerge from your practice?
  • how might you understand or rethink loss, gain, documentation, liveness, and originality in relation to your traces?

making the news and advocacy

On 5 March 2017 Times Higher Education published a brief article [1] about whether or not a film can be research.

It’s rehashes two old issues in practice-as-research:

  • can artistic work present (or be) an argument? (when I would think a more interesting question is should it?)
  • what are the possibilities and limitations of peer review in practice-as-research submissions?

I was frustrated at just how little we have come since the heady days of PARIP, but the article was also a useful reminder that much important work remains to be done in advocating practice-as-research at the level of HE management, in policy, and (perhaps most importantly) how its value (particularly in relation to epistemology) might be communicated outside of its bubble.

Interesting to see the Journal of Embodied Research getting a plug when it hasn’t yet published its first volume. Screenworks (that was initially distributed through The Journal of Media Practice) has been cracking on since 2006, and to a lesser extent the International Journal of Screendance (which I co-edit with Harmony Bench) are current platforms for publishing moving-image-as-research.

I particularly like the use of quote marks around the word “published” in the last sentence.

Any thoughts?


  1. Here is a PDF version of the article: film-as-research

visibility and askance

Visibility within practice-based research can expose and question visual hierarchies, authority, authorship, the politics of technology, balances of power and representation or prompt dissent. … The concept of visibility generates a dual arrangement: of what can be seen operating with what cannot be seen.

Askance?Oblique Conference 2017, 31 March 2017 at Sheffield Hallam University, UK.

https://visibilityconference.carbonmade.com/projects/6327184

This is part of a call for proposals (with due date 20 February 2017).

international symposium on par

The Hong Kong Academy for Performing Arts is hosting a symposium on practice-as-research 4-6 December 2017.

It aims to bring together thinkers, practitioners, researchers and leaders to discuss and explore Practice as Research in an environment that mirrors Hong Kong itself, a confluence of the east and west, each with its rich cultural traditions and artistic practices.

The symposium overview, including call for proposals is at http://ispar.hkapa.edu.

 

call for submissions – jar

I can’t find any direct link to this call for submissions for the Journal for Artistic Research, but here are some basic details.

Call for Submissions: JAR Issue 14 – Autumn 2017

The deadline for consideration is 17 March 2017

To be considered for Peer Review, the editorial board considers:

1. Whether the exposition exposes artistic practice as research. This goes beyond simply documenting, describing, or writing about work. It engages with questions and claims about knowledge within practice. For a detailed articulation of this please read the editorial to JAR0.
2. The degree to which the exposition is conceptually and artistically strong, considered, and significant to the field.
3. Whether the multimedia and design capacities of the RC have been used effectively and meaningfully to support the argument or understanding of the research.

To submit an article, contributors are required to register for an account on the RC and use the online writing space to layout and expose their research. JAR provides editorial and technical guidance with these processes.

For our guidelines on submissions visit:
http://www.jar-online.net/index.php/pages/view/123

For submissions information, and advice on whether your research is suitable for JAR, contact the Managing Editor, Phoebe Stubbs, at submissions@jar-online.net

journal of embodied research

Journal of Embodied Research is the first peer-reviewed, open access, academic journal to focus specifically on the innovation and dissemination of embodied knowledge through the medium of video.

http://jer.openlibhums.org/

It will be very interesting to see how the journal pans out, and in particular what conversations emerge out of how we might understand embodiment in relation to screen-based performance and work.