visibility and askance

Visibility within practice-based research can expose and question visual hierarchies, authority, authorship, the politics of technology, balances of power and representation or prompt dissent. … The concept of visibility generates a dual arrangement: of what can be seen operating with what cannot be seen.

Askance?Oblique Conference 2017, 31 March 2017 at Sheffield Hallam University, UK.

https://visibilityconference.carbonmade.com/projects/6327184

This is part of a call for proposals (with due date 20 February 2017).

international symposium on par

The Hong Kong Academy for Performing Arts is hosting a symposium on practice-as-research 4-6 December 2017.

It aims to bring together thinkers, practitioners, researchers and leaders to discuss and explore Practice as Research in an environment that mirrors Hong Kong itself, a confluence of the east and west, each with its rich cultural traditions and artistic practices.

The symposium overview, including call for proposals is at http://ispar.hkapa.edu.

 

call for submissions – jar

I can’t find any direct link to this call for submissions for the Journal for Artistic Research, but here are some basic details.

Call for Submissions: JAR Issue 14 – Autumn 2017

The deadline for consideration is 17 March 2017

To be considered for Peer Review, the editorial board considers:

1. Whether the exposition exposes artistic practice as research. This goes beyond simply documenting, describing, or writing about work. It engages with questions and claims about knowledge within practice. For a detailed articulation of this please read the editorial to JAR0.
2. The degree to which the exposition is conceptually and artistically strong, considered, and significant to the field.
3. Whether the multimedia and design capacities of the RC have been used effectively and meaningfully to support the argument or understanding of the research.

To submit an article, contributors are required to register for an account on the RC and use the online writing space to layout and expose their research. JAR provides editorial and technical guidance with these processes.

For our guidelines on submissions visit:
http://www.jar-online.net/index.php/pages/view/123

For submissions information, and advice on whether your research is suitable for JAR, contact the Managing Editor, Phoebe Stubbs, at submissions@jar-online.net

exhausted academies

a critique of the ‘exhausting’ achievement-oriented and instrumentalised tendencies of the contemporary neoliberal institution, and a return to a ‘verticalist’ perspective that ‘makes space’ for attention and concentration; for experiment, novel questions and speculation; for reflexivity, new modes of imagination and historic profundity; for an open-ended form of differential thinking that values not-knowing, the singular, the affective, the transgressive, and the unforeseen.

– http://not-yet-there.blogspot.com/2016/11/event-exhausted-academies.html

 Exhausted Academies
Fine Art Studio
Nottingham Trent University
Thursday 3 November, 2pm to 5pm

artistic doctorates in europe

Last Tuesday (25 October 2016) I went to an open conversation about practice-as-research at Middlesex University called Artistic Doctorates in Europe – Current issues and Practices. It was the first in a number of meetings as part of a project led by Vida Midgelow (Middlesex, UK), Jane Bacon (Chichester, UK), Leena Rouhiainen (University of the Arts, Helsinki, Finland) and Camilla Damkjaer (Stockholm University of the Arts, Sweden) in partnership with four professional arts organisations: Dance4 (United Kingdom), Kiasma Theatre – Museum of Contemporary Arts and Zodiak Centre for New Dance (Finland) and WELD (Sweden). The group has some Erasmus+ European funding to investigate issues related to practice-as-research doctorates, and in particular related to students working in and through somatic and dance practices.

Here’s a list of some things I felt were important as I listened:

  1. Documentation: sense of duty to both the artist-researcher and the field in considering the nature of practices of documentation. That is, how might the work persist through time?
  2. Epistemology: The vexed question of the epistemological value of practice-as-research seems to be (at least in my eyes) its least considered and understood aspect. There remains a great deal of work to be done that ensures we don’t fall into epistemological traps to do with knowledge generation.
  3. Resources: there remain no clear ways for PhD students to fund the development and production of their practices. This means that practice-as-research tends to produce small-scale and often solo practices. At the same time, it’s worth remembering practice-as-research PhDs provide that most precious of commodity for artists: time.
  4. Communication and policy: As practice-as-research is increasingly established in University systems (including at undergraduate and graduate levels), its senior practitioners have a duty of care to find ways to communicate the principles and values of practice-as-research beyond the field, and to look for ways to help develop policy that (at the very least) makes sense to alternative ways of knowing and understanding the world, and supports more open pedagogical values and systems (across higher education).
  5. Supervision: PhD students are increasingly entering highly regulated systems (they might be called sausage factories) in which they are on the receiving end of protocols that inhibit –rather than support – their development as scholars. Last night it was mentioned that we have forgotten that PhDs are a pedagogical and dialogic exchange between students and supervisors. Our systems need to reflect the openness (and scholarly vitality) of this exchange.

A lot more was discussed and presented, and I’ll post bits and pieces (including resources) over the coming weeks. I’ll also post the ADIE website when it’s live. Stay tuned.