rafting-with

Access to Christina Houghton’s practice-research PhD at the Auckland University of Technology. It’s a hefty series of downloads (10GB+).

https://aut.researchgateway.ac.nz/handle/10292/11776

The ethico-poetics manifests minimal and minor narratives of belonging with all species, releasing (attitudes of ) hierarchical control and guides the research deeper toward its ethical focus in relation to narratives of the Anthropocene. Joanna Zylinska’s minimal ethics and Erin Manning’s minor gesture, move toward fracturing grand narratives through thought-in- action as choreographic methods attuned to speculative pragmatics. The final conceptual coupling within this research exists across William Forsythe’s choreographic object and André Lepecki’s afterlives toward an un-mastered release for choreographic thinking-in-action, which lingers, hangs on, or survives after the choreographic event. Here an everyday poetics envelops in the way relationally distributed bodies of choreographic objects survive.

— Christina Houghton (part of abstract)
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culture of research

Long time between posts …

I went to Becky Hilton’s workshop at Independent Dance back in December. It was a rich and playful weekend.

At one stage we were each given a certain amount of time to ask something or do something (I forget now). The group was quite mixed – artists, people just starting out on PhDs, others working in academia – and I asked them a question:

What is this culture of research doing (or has done) to art, performance and dance?

Someone said that it had given them time and space to work (perhaps this was referring to doing a PhD?), another felt that it had made the climate more competitive (perhaps this was about academia?). My sense is that the academic climate has become more competitive in general (after all, competition and neoliberalism are old pals: http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/politicsandpolicy/the-cult-of-competitiveness/), and that it would be hard to say that a culture of reseach has done this to the arts.

Another person mentioned that the Arts Council still thinks of research in terms of research and development. That research is the thing you do before you get to make the piece.

Becky described her sense of the “continuity of community” that the research culture has made possible. Reading between the lines I’d imagine that this – at least in part – has to do with the responsibility of engaging with communities of practice that is vital to research processes and practices.

And another person mentioned that they felt that research in the arts had become an antidote to R&D and projects. I like this, that research enables us to rethink the ways in which we pursue our curiosity and imaginations.

advisory group

The Practice Research Advisory Group has set up a website over at https://prag-uk.org. It contains a blog with different people posting various perspectives on practice research, an initial glossary of terms (that includes examples as part of quite detailed responses to each term), and a list of resources.

 

self-interview

Part of the game of any research process is finding ways to test your one’s own thinking, understanding, biases1 and assumptions. The dancer Chrysa Parkinson posted a self-interview in 2011 as (I suspect) a way to develop and share her understanding:

It’s playful, lucid and direct, and such a useful example of a way for artists to interrupt their thinking or to draw a line under a period of practice or research.

Tip of the hat to my friend and colleague Scott deLahunta for sending me the video.


  1. I’ve written about cognitive biases here: https://simonkellis.wordpress.com/2018/03/25/cognitive-biases/