Anna Furse’s I am not a piece of meat

think of this space as a body of evidence

http://www.iamnotapieceofmeat.com

A digital publication by Anna Furse.

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advisory group

The Practice Research Advisory Group has set up a website over at https://prag-uk.org. It contains a blog with different people posting various perspectives on practice research, an initial glossary of terms (that includes examples as part of quite detailed responses to each term), and a list of resources.

 

self-interview

Part of the game of any research process is finding ways to test your one’s own thinking, understanding, biases1 and assumptions. The dancer Chrysa Parkinson posted a self-interview in 2011 as (I suspect) a way to develop and share her understanding:

It’s playful, lucid and direct, and such a useful example of a way for artists to interrupt their thinking or to draw a line under a period of practice or research.

Tip of the hat to my friend and colleague Scott deLahunta for sending me the video.


  1. I’ve written about cognitive biases here: https://simonkellis.wordpress.com/2018/03/25/cognitive-biases/ 

 

multimedia phd case studies

The British Library placement student Coral Manton has produced a series of case studies of PhD students working with and in multimedia PhDs:

[The students] discuss the artefacts and content they’re producing and the challenges they’ve encountered around long-term archiving, managing rights and permissions, seeking advice from libraries, and ensuring access for future researchers to allow them to build on the research.

Here’s the link:

https://www.bl.uk/research-collaboration/doctoral-research/multimedia%20PhDs%20case%20studies#

Clearly, how non-traditional research is able to be archived and accessed continues to be a key question for institutions and individuals.

 

fascinations

I’ve posted one of Richard Blythe’s practice-based PhD summaries before but never got round to an extended version from 2016. In it he discusses artists’ fascinations (from about 2:50min):

[fascinations] are the sense of the wonderful, the things that practitioenrs return to again and again – their muses if you like, images, particular kinds of light conditions, projects by other practitioners – that have drawn extended enquiry from the practitioner … the projects that they will return to again and again, thinking through their own works. Fascinations can be text based, image based, paintings, art works, philosophical texts, all kinds of manner of thing; a fascination pool of individual practices.

Here’s the full embed:

If you are involved in a PaR PhD, or just interested in understanding the way in which PaR involves telecoping into instances of practice while extended and searching beyond their borders, then this video is well worth a watch.

 

that thing produced

I recently wrote a book chapter called That Thing Produced and in it I explore the epistemic conditions and possibilities of practice-research. Here’s a small sample:

In this chapter, I use the term knowledge in the conflated and ambiguous way – both intellectual endeavour and a tool for the knowledge economy. I do so to recognise its common usage in contemporary higher education, and to acknowledge that the absence of nuance enables academics rather fortuitously to speak with different audiences in the academy (with different goals, desires, histories and understandings) as if we are talking about the same thing. For example, even the statement “I am doing research” comes loaded with ambiguity because of how different people might understand differently the epistemic value and purpose of doing research. (p.483)

The chapter is part of a book called A World of Muscle, Bone & Organs: Research and Scholarship in Dance, and it is an open access PDF available from: www.coventry.ac.uk/c-dare/e-book.